Master of International Relations and Diplomacy

Studying a master's degree in international relations and diplomacy is among the most important disciplines that serve the work of institutions specialized in political and international affairs and community issues. And Soliman International University seeks to develop a curriculum commensurate with the trends in force in the world in order to provide students with an [...]

Studying a master’s degree in international relations and diplomacy is among the most important disciplines that serve the work of institutions specialized in political and international affairs and community issues. And Soliman International University seeks to develop a curriculum commensurate with the trends in force in the world in order to provide students with an opportunity to specialize in fields that are consistent with the need to develop intellectual capabilities and awareness of the issue of political systems.
The master’s which the college seeks to implement aims to deepen and develop the knowledge and analytical capabilities of the student researcher of the contemporary social and political phenomenon, which contributes to raising his efficiency in developing his scientific and practical skills in the functional field or in civil society organizations and other fields related to political changes in the political arena in most The countries he lives in.

Key features of the course

  • Graduating researchers and diplomats.
  • Providing community institutions with political competencies capable of representing their countries in international forums.
  • Enhance students’ knowledge on the most important issues and developments in international relations.
  • Develop students’ experiences and knowledge on international relations in the Middle East.
  • Provide students with basic theories in this field and enhance their critical thinking abilities.
  • Provide students with theoretical research skills on the structures, procedures and policies of international and transnational relations.
  • Develop the student’s ability to apply theoretical knowledge in understanding contemporary international relations.
  • Enhance students’ international experiences.

The first stage - Compulsory courses 96 Credits

1
Scientific Research Methodology

Research Methods and Scientific Methodology course aims to introduce students to the different models of ways to carry out useful legal research. Students will acquire knowledge about the design, methodology and techniques of scientific research, data collection, analysis and interpretation, and the use of research data in order to reach logical results that address the research problem. This course will help each student develop their ability to use this knowledge to become more effective as a legal researcher.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes. 

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2
International Relations

The course includes an introduction to the student about the development of international relations concepts and theories, and the problems facing the creation of an integrated scientific theory of international relations. The course includes the study of realist theories (power), behavioral theories (systems), and ideal theories (international organizations). It also includes the study of theories of external decision-making, theories of international conflict, its causes, how to manage it, and intervention to solve it.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

3
Negotiation art

The course aims to explain the concept of negotiation and its characteristics, identify its types and methods, and help the student to know negotiation methods and skills, especially with regard to the characteristics and skills of a negotiator, the tasks performed by negotiation, and its objectives. It also aims to explain the relationship between negotiation and public relations, explaining the objectives and tasks of public relations by presenting the context of the historical development of negotiation and its main areas, touching on the characteristics of negotiation and effective negotiation skills, explaining the essential role that public relations play in the art of negotiation.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

4
The origins of political analysis

The course presents the concepts, ideas, and tools necessary to analyze politics and understand its facts, and provides a description and analysis of the issues that occupy the mind of contemporary man: democracy, political behavior, political evaluation, policy making, and addresses the issue of power and influence through specific examples of those who have different degrees of them, in order to help the student to Creative awareness of the realities of the world of politics and its makers.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

5
The origins of diplomatic and consular relations

The course deals with a lot of historical information about the emergence of diplomatic relations and their historical development until the modern era. It also originally clarifies the definition and concept of diplomacy, and refers to the patterns and forms of diplomacy, consular immunity, and diplomacy in its various forms.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

6
Political economy

The course examines the nature of wealth and the ways of its formation through the well-known elements of production (labor, nature, and capital) to be distributed to individuals, and also explains the importance of taxes and fees imposed by governments, and other topics in a simple form that brings the student close to major economic concepts that affect his life The daily, such as the concept of political economy science, its topics, curricula, and its relations with other sciences, the nature of the economic problem, methods and tools of economic analysis, economic systems and their types, the most important schools of economic thought.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

Optional courses 24 Credits

1
The Political Structure of the European Union

The course aims to study the nature of the European Union and the foundations on which it was founded, the historical developments and political events that affected its formation in its current form, and the most important goals that it achieves. It also aims to study the most important institutions concerned with achieving the political and economic goals of the European Union, and the charters regulating the work of these institutions. It reviews examples of the most important efforts undertaken by various institutions to achieve the security and political goals of the European Union countries. It deals with the most important areas in which European countries overlap in order to achieve security and economic and political strength for the European Union, and to enhance its active role in various regional and global political and economic events.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

2
European Union Strategic Policies

The course focuses on managing the European Union and the foundations from which it was launched to ensure the independence of its countries in its policies with integration within the union's general strategies and common policies. It explains the ways to finance the union to achieve economic and monetary unity and the declaration of the eurozone, how to build common foreign, security and defense policies, the structure of European law and a mechanism The work of the Court of Justice and the political and legal nature of the union and the challenges it faces.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

3
Political crisis management

The course deals with a set of topics of importance regarding the process of managing political crises, methods and strategies for eliminating political crises at the international level. The general rationale for dealing with this topic is divided into two parts. The first is theoretical and focuses on terms associated with this matter, such as the objectives, characteristics and functions of political crisis management, from the point of view of administrative sciences. The second is practical, and deals with how to find appropriate solutions to all political crises and problems at the international level that countries and governments face. In this context, it focuses on how the head of state or government and political officials can find quick and appropriate solutions according to the standards of efficiency and effectiveness, and under the various pressures that they may face, in order to besiege the crises facing the state, and to address and get rid of existing and current problems.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

4
Geopolitics

The course includes a study of the concept of geopolitics and the origins on which the science of geopolitics depends and its relationship to various variables, a study of the developments in the origins of geopolitical sciences and the efforts of researchers towards forming a clear understanding of political geography, and a study of the most important components and ways to understand the interactive relationships between the various components of geopolitical sciences at the level of civilizations and cultures and studying many applied fields through which geopolitical sciences can be effectively used in various fields, and study the most important areas that need further studies in them in relation to geopolitical sciences and ways to develop applied work in them in improving understanding of the nature of events and developing decision-making systems.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

5
Political history

The course is divided into three parts: Part One: It reviews the history of political thought from the Athenian democracy to the Christian Middle Ages, and is distinguished by its encyclopedia, and also in careful detail of opinions and philosophers. Part two: extends since the European Renaissance, when Machiavelli; And how the latter laid politics on new rules, causing an intellectual rupture with Plato and the Christian philosophical heritage. Then the impact of the Protestant religious reform on politics, passing through the major revolutions and the emergence of theories of natural right and the social contract that deals with them in detail. And the end of Spinoza, who returned the human mind to the earth and his critical opinions of religion, and advocates freedom of opinion and expression. The third part: reviews the major currents that followed the Enlightenment: nationalism, liberalism, and socialism, and how they developed in each country and among its main thinkers.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

6
Political Sociology

The course reviews the most prominent ideas of the pioneers of political sociology, deals with the sociological meaning of political participation, studies the subject and origin of political sociology, highlights research methods and tools in political sociology, and reviews intellectual premises and theoretical trends in political sociology.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

The second stage - Practical Training 30 Credits

1
Practical Training

In practical training, the student is assigned to teach a virtual course chosen by the college from among the courses studied by the student at the bachelor's level. The student should divide this course from twelve to fourteen brief lectures. The student presents each lecture in the form of a written summary of its topic in Word or PDF format, accompanied by a video recording of it with the student's voice using Power Point, the duration of which is no less than ten minutes and not more than about twenty minutes.

The thrid stage - Master's Thesis 54 Credits

1
Master’s Thesis

The student submits a request to the university administration to register a master’s thesis, along with a proposed topic in one of the subspecialty tracks.

● If the initial approval of the subject title is achieved, the college council will designate a supervisor to guide and follow up the student in preparing the plan.

● The research plan includes the importance of the topic and a critical presentation of previous studies in it, specifically the research problem, then defining the study's curriculum and its main hypotheses or questions that you want to answer, and the division of the study and its sources.

● The student presents his proposed plan in a scientific seminar, discussing the plan as a topic and an approach.

● The student adjusts his plan based on the professors' observations in the seminar if he is asked to amend.

● After the seminar, the plan is presented to the college council to take its decision regarding the registration of the subject.

● In the event of approval, the college council’s decision is presented to the university council to approve registration, and the registration date is calculated from the university council’s approval date

To study a master’s degree at International Suleiman College, applicants must have an undergraduate degree from an accredited university. At International Suleiman College, we believe that a bachelor's degree is no longer enough to compete in the labor market, so we offer high-quality postgraduate programs for anyone who has a bachelor's degree and wishes to achieve their academic and research ambitions.
International Suleiman College provides a study commensurate with the student's capabilities, especially in line with the time allotted daily for study, given that the master's student has practical and social responsibilities. We expect fully taught students to be able to obtain a master's degree within two academic years. We expect students studying partially to be able to obtain a master's degree within 3-4 years of study.
The academic year is divided into four semesters. In each semester, the student is allowed to register a maximum of two research courses and one minimum course with a maximum of 24 credit hours and a minimum of 12 credit hours. Classes are distributed as follows: • The first semester begins at the beginning of the third week of October and ends at the end of the third week of December. • The second semester begins at the beginning of the first week of January and ends at the end of the first week of March. • The third semester begins at the beginning of the second week of March and ends at the end of the second week of May. • The fourth semester begins at the beginning of the fourth week of May and ends at the end of the fourth week of July. • Summer vacation begins at the beginning of August and continues for the third week of October. • After the end of each semester, a two-week vacation is scheduled between semesters.
The tuition fee is £75 per credit hour, • Students are allowed to register a maximum of 24 credit hours each semester and 12 credit hours as a minimum. • The student pays a one-time enrollment fee of 200 pounds when registering with the ISC • The student pays 100 sterling pounds per semester as the registration fee for study subjects. • The iddat hour = four actual hours.
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