Master of Political Systems

The Master of Political Systems seeks to introduce the field of comparative politics and its development, the methods used in the study of political systems, ancient and modern, the environmental framework of political systems, and the functions of governmental and non-governmental political systems, in terms of system inputs and outputs, in addition to paying attention [...]

The Master of Political Systems seeks to introduce the field of comparative politics and its development, the methods used in the study of political systems, ancient and modern, the environmental framework of political systems, and the functions of governmental and non-governmental political systems, in terms of system inputs and outputs, in addition to paying attention to the political party, the types and characteristics of party systems, and the impact of systems Partisanship in the structure of the political and constitutional systems of the state, in addition to defining pressure and interest groups, and forms of electoral systems

Key features of the course

  • Clarify ideology, sects and schools in politics
  • Developing skills in practicing modern methods to achieve efficiency and effectiveness in the field of politics.
  • Helping the administration implement its strategy through its effectiveness in translating problems from the perspective of different sciences and linking them with political science.

The first stage - Compulsory courses 72 Credits

1
Scientific Research Methodology

The course includes scientific research methods related to defining scientific research and clarifying its importance, types, steps and methods. It also deals with the sources and methods of data collection and methods of data analysis as well as methods of inspection and estimation and all statistical methods that can be used in the processes of analysis and scientific research in the fields of economics and management.

2
Democracy and democratization

The course falls within the issues that do not expire, as the subject of democratic transformation is rooted in global political agendas, which regimes seek to adopt in order to get out of tyranny, and on this we will address very important elements in order to see what the process of democratic transformation is and the conditions that should be provided for the transition from dictatorship to the ranks of states We will include many examples of the various successful experiences that have been able to consolidate democratic values ​​and culture, without forgetting to address the obstacles that stand in the way of the democratization process and cause setbacks that destroy the ambition of building a state of institutions.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

3
Comparative systems of government

The course deals with first: what is comparative politics, second: the development of comparative politics, third: types of government systems, and it talks about systems of government according to the form of the state. , namely: the central government system, the local administration system, the administrative decentralization system, the autonomy system), and the complex state (this type of state includes four types: personal union, actual union, confederation, and federal union). The systems of government are according to the head of the state receiving the reins of government, and the systems of government in the country are divided according to the head of the state receiving the reins of government into the monarchy and the republican system. And governance systems according to the method of taking power, and government systems are divided according to the way the head of state takes power into: the dictatorial system of government, and the democratic system of government (the democratic system of government includes three types: the direct democratic system of government, the semi-direct democratic system of government, and the indirect democratic system of government ) . The systems of government according to the relationship between the authorities, and the systems of government followed vary according to the relationship between these authorities to: the council system, the presidential system, and the parliamentary system.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

4
Public administration and local government

The course aims to study the nature of the role played by local government institutions in serving the public interest. On this basis, the study deals with the following topics: the nature and emergence of local administration and local government, the reasons that led to the establishment of these various bodies, the goals that called for the establishment of local administrations and governments, and the organizational and environmental factors affecting them, multiple and different models of local administrative bodies, partnership strategies between institutions Local governance, the central authority and civil society institutions, strategies for developing local government institutions, a future look at administration and local governance systems.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

5
Comparative Politics Theories

The course focuses on discussing recent trends in the study of comparative politics by taking the state, its theories and patterns as a basic entry point for analysis. The state and its institutions have traditionally represented the heart of political analysis theories and the study of political systems and its main focus. Despite the rise of trends calling for underestimating the centrality of the state in political analysis in favor of shedding light on other levels, some of which are below the state (such as the individual, groups, parties and movements) and others above the state regionally and globally, this did not prevent the renewed call for re-attention to the state as a major level of analysis that is difficult to understand. Other political phenomena and interactions without being attributed to him. In this context, theoretical trends in the study of the state provide an indispensable introduction to the study of comparative politics, and an understanding of the different dimensions of interaction between the state, society, the market, and the individual in different contexts. The study of the state also allows addressing basic issues in political analysis in the context of their relationship to and influenced by the state and its nature, such as the emergence of authoritarian and democratic regimes and the dynamics of their continuation and transformation (within the framework of dealing with democratic and non-democratic states), and the role of religion and military institutions in political systems (within the framework of dealing with civil and religious forms of states The military and what is known as “national security” states), dependency (within the framework of dealing with dependent state models), development (within the framework of the various manifestations of the developmental state), globalization and revolution, leading to the issues of state collapse and chaos (in what is known as failed, helpless or fragile states) and external interference to rebuild countries.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

6
The origins of political analysis

The course presents the concepts, ideas, and tools necessary to analyze politics and understand its facts, and provides a description and analysis of the issues that occupy the mind of contemporary man: democracy, political behavior, political evaluation, policy making, and addresses the issue of power and influence through specific examples of those who have different degrees of them, in order to help the student to Creative awareness of the realities of the world of politics and its makers.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

Optional courses 24 Credits

1
Political Sociology

The course reviews the most prominent ideas of the pioneers of political sociology, deals with the sociological meaning of political participation, studies the subject and origin of political sociology, highlights research methods and tools in political sociology, and reviews intellectual premises and theoretical trends in political sociology.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

2
The foreign policy of the big countries

The course seeks to study and analyze the foreign policies of major countries in terms of analyzing the internal and external factors affecting this policy, and the main objectives of foreign policies, analyzing foreign policy tools starting from diplomacy to the military tool, studying and analyzing the foreign policy of the United States, Russia, China, Britain France, Germany, and Japan.

3
Political development

The course deals with an important branch of comparative politics that emerged in the aftermath of World War II, which is "political development". The focus here is on the phenomenon of political backwardness in the third world countries, and the theories and models of political development that were presented in the West as a solution to the problems of the third world countries. The course also focuses on the alternative models and theories that have emerged to confront the phenomenon of political backwardness, with a focus on the phenomenon of transition to democratic regimes and the Islamic perspective of the development process in general.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

4
Public opinion and political propaganda

The course seeks to shed light on the issue of public opinion and propaganda by introducing public opinion and its types and the way to measure it. On the other hand, studying propaganda in terms of its types and methods, leading to rumours, through the following axes: Public opinion: its definition, origin, development, characteristics and types. Measuring public opinion (referendum method, survey method “observation and interview”, method of content analysis), and its obstacles in developing countries. Factors of public opinion formation (the role of religion in the formation of public opinion, the impact of economic and political conditions on the formation of public opinion, the role of leaders and leaders in the formation of public opinion, the international climate and its impact on the formation of public opinion). The media and its impact on the formation of public opinion (the press and the formation of public opinion, the role of radio in the formation of public opinion, the role of television in the formation of public opinion). Pressure groups and public opinion. Propaganda: its definition, types, methods, models of its modern political patterns. Rumor: its definition, conditions, and its relationship to public opinion and propaganda. Psychological warfare, its methods and means, and how to respond to it and protect society from its damages. A field study of a situation lost to public opinion and the development of an adverse propaganda plan. Political propaganda (German-Nazi propaganda, Zionist propaganda, communist propaganda).

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

5
The foreign policy of the major powers

The course seeks to study and analyze the foreign policies of major countries in terms of analyzing the internal and external factors affecting this policy, and the main objectives of foreign policies, analyzing foreign policy tools from diplomacy to the military tool, studying and analyzing the foreign policy of the United States, Russia, China, Britain France, Germany, and Japan.


The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

6
Human rights between East and West

The course seeks to address most of the human rights that can be monitored in scientific research, starting with a statement of the concept of human rights through highlighting the rights of social life, then analyzing and classifying political rights. And highlighting economic rights and rooting them, then dividing social rights into eight important points, and we had to go to environmental and health rights in two important topics. in comparative points.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

The second stage - Practical Training 30 Credits

1
Practical Training

In practical training, the student is assigned to teach a virtual course chosen by the college from among the courses studied by the student at the bachelor's level. The student should divide this course from twelve to fourteen brief lectures. The student presents each lecture in the form of a written summary of its topic in Word or PDF format, accompanied by a video recording of it with the student's voice using Power Point, the duration of which is no less than ten minutes and not more than about twenty minutes.

The thrid stage - Master's Thesis 54 Credits

1
Master’s Thesis

The student submits a request to the university administration to register a master’s thesis, along with a proposed topic in one of the subspecialty tracks.

● If the initial approval of the subject title is achieved, the college council will designate a supervisor to guide and follow up the student in preparing the plan.

● The research plan includes the importance of the topic and a critical presentation of previous studies in it, specifically the research problem, then defining the study's curriculum and its main hypotheses or questions that you want to answer, and the division of the study and its sources.

● The student presents his proposed plan in a scientific seminar, discussing the plan as a topic and an approach.

● The student adjusts his plan based on the professors' observations in the seminar if he is asked to amend.

● After the seminar, the plan is presented to the college council to take its decision regarding the registration of the subject.

● In the event of approval, the college council’s decision is presented to the university council to approve registration, and the registration date is calculated from the university council’s approval date

To study a master’s degree at International Suleiman College, applicants must have an undergraduate degree from an accredited university. At International Suleiman College, we believe that a bachelor's degree is no longer enough to compete in the labor market, so we offer high-quality postgraduate programs for anyone who has a bachelor's degree and wishes to achieve their academic and research ambitions.
International Suleiman College provides a study commensurate with the student's capabilities, especially in line with the time allotted daily for study, given that the master's student has practical and social responsibilities. We expect fully taught students to be able to obtain a master's degree within two academic years. We expect students studying partially to be able to obtain a master's degree within 3-4 years of study.
The academic year is divided into four semesters. In each semester, the student is allowed to register a maximum of two research courses and one minimum course with a maximum of 24 credit hours and a minimum of 12 credit hours. Classes are distributed as follows: • The first semester begins at the beginning of the third week of October and ends at the end of the third week of December. • The second semester begins at the beginning of the first week of January and ends at the end of the first week of March. • The third semester begins at the beginning of the second week of March and ends at the end of the second week of May. • The fourth semester begins at the beginning of the fourth week of May and ends at the end of the fourth week of July. • Summer vacation begins at the beginning of August and continues for the third week of October. • After the end of each semester, a two-week vacation is scheduled between semesters.
The tuition fee is £75 per credit hour, • Students are allowed to register a maximum of 24 credit hours each semester and 12 credit hours as a minimum. • The student pays a one-time enrollment fee of 200 pounds when registering with the ISC • The student pays 100 sterling pounds per semester as the registration fee for study subjects. • The iddat hour = four actual hours.
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