Master of Negotiation and International Conflict Resolution

Conflict resolution skills are essential to creating successful relationships between people, communities, and organizations. The MSc Negotiation and Conflict Resolution prepares students to analyze the root causes and dynamics of conflict and transform conflicts through logical and resourceful interventions. Through our educational environment supervised by competent professors and internationally leading practitioners in the field of [...]

Conflict resolution skills are essential to creating successful relationships between people, communities, and organizations. The MSc Negotiation and Conflict Resolution prepares students to analyze the root causes and dynamics of conflict and transform conflicts through logical and resourceful interventions. Through our educational environment supervised by competent professors and internationally leading practitioners in the field of negotiation and conflict resolution, the program focuses on developing self-awareness, perseverance and personal competence; Building common ground opening lines of communication ensuring representation and recognition; and building sustainable possibilities for the solution. Flexible program options cater to young and Mediterranean academics and political practitioners as well as to people seeking to advance their political and academic careers.

Key features of the course

  • Analyze international conflicts and negotiations in order to develop accurate policy recommendations, negotiation strategies, and tactical responses.
  • Examine and deal with some of the critical economic, legal, ethical and political dilemmas facing states and decision-makers in the aftermath of war.
  • Analyze trends, issues, debates, and dilemmas in post-conflict transitions and reconstruction to understand the challenges encountered and lessons learned in specific cases of post-war transitions.
  • Preparing academics who seek to spread peace through the role of negotiation and mediation in managing global conflict.
  • Identify the underlying causes and dynamics of conflict and use professional negotiation skills to resolve conflicts.

The first stage - Compulsory courses 72 Credits

1
Scientific Research Methodology

The course includes scientific research methods related to defining scientific research and clarifying its importance, types, steps and methods. It also deals with the sources and methods of data collection and methods of data analysis as well as methods of inspection and estimation and all statistical methods that can be used in the processes of analysis and scientific research in the fields of economics and management.

2
Diplomatic negotiation between countries

The course focuses on the diplomatic negotiation that takes place between states and governments, with all that it includes of mutual bargaining and concessions, as a major and important tool for settling international conflicts. Diplomatic negotiation is to reserve the corner in the state’s communication with other states, and it is considered as the basic building block on which the state relies in securing its interests and settling its succession and disputes with other states in a peaceful manner based on persuasion and dialogue, and away from coercion and coercion. In light of this, the course structure is divided into ten chapters. As for the first chapter, we have devoted it to presenting a methodological framework and a theoretical vision for diplomatic negotiation between states. As for the second chapter, we have devoted it to revealing the paths of negotiation between states, by studying the negotiating curricula at the negotiating table, as well as studying Diplomatic negotiation strategies types and characteristics. As for the third chapter, we went to discuss the stages of the diplomatic negotiation process, starting from the pre-negotiation stage, passing through the formula stage, or what is called the stage of agreeing on the general principles of the settlement, all the way to the stage of details and agreement on the final settlement. As for the fourth chapter, we have devoted it to planning the diplomatic negotiation process, ie preparing for negotiating activity at the negotiating table. While we went in the fifth chapter to study the results of diplomatic negotiations and the resulting treaties or agreements. In the sixth and seventh chapters, we studied the principles of negotiation in the West by looking at the Harvard School method of negotiation, as well as studying the principles of negotiation in Islam by looking at the principles of negotiation according to Ali bin Abi Talib. As for the eighth chapter, we have devoted it to searching for the skills and qualities of an effective negotiator. While we went in the ninth chapter to study the process of negotiation with the enemy, by showing how countries negotiate without the presence of diplomatic relations, and finally we put in the tenth chapter a guiding framework that enables negotiators to know how countries negotiate and what their methods are at the negotiating table, and given the difficulty of monitoring negotiation methods for all Countries in the world, we have studied negotiating methods for selected international models, we have studied the American negotiating style as a model, and we have studied the Chinese negotiating style because of its importance as a model for a rising Asian state in the international system, and as a model through which we can see the Asian negotiating methods that are almost They are convergent due to the cultural overlap between Asian countries that follow the culture of the higher context. Moreover, we have studied the Iranian negotiation style, as a model for a Middle Eastern Islamic country, and it has achieved many negotiating successes and breakthroughs in the field of negotiation with major powers, and many differ about it despite the similarity of its negotiating style. Finally, we concluded the course with a set of general advice on negotiation as a way to greater understanding and more successful practice.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

3
The role of international bodies and organizations in resolving international conflicts and fostering international peace and security

The course is divided into two main topics: the first topic deals with the United Nations and its role in the field of international peace and security, and the second topic focuses on analyzing the reality of the role played by the organization in the case of Kuwait and Iraq, which some considered a role model in the subsequent activities of the United Nations. And because the division of opinion about any role played by the United Nations is relevant to any crisis that it addresses, in the case of Kuwait and Iraq it did not deviate from the norm, but in this course we preferred to clarify the situation and resolve doubt with certainty. Supporting the right to cooperate and achieve the hoped-for prosperity for countries and peoples.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

4
Peaceful means of resolving international disputes

The course reviews the main processes aimed at preventing, managing, containing, resolving or transforming conflict in an international setting. The course will discuss theoretical assumptions about the conflict and whether it is solvable or at best only for good management. It must also be questioned whether the human community is interested in finding lasting solutions to its conflicts in the first place, and under what circumstances. Furthermore, the course covers relevant concepts, models, and frameworks for understanding the workings of social conflict resolution. For example, solutions processes such as peace processes, peace agreements, peacekeeping, negotiation, mediation, peace building, peace implementation, national dialogue, transitional justice and reconciliation will be discussed. The course will allocate ample time for the applied dimension of conflict transformation study, such as role-playing in a negotiation process, simulation of mediation processes, and a problem-solving workshop. In addition, the course examines the applicability of conflict resolution processes in real global conflicts such as conflict prevention in Macedonia, the peace process in Northern Ireland and Syria, mediation in Bosnia, negotiation and mediation in Northern Ireland and Palestine, military intervention in Kosovo, and international intervention in Libya, Peacekeeping in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Bosnia, Transitional Justice in Iraq and Liberia, National Dialogue in Yemen and Tunisia, Reconciliation in South Africa and the Truth Commission in Morocco. Case studies are chosen to reflect different types of conflict such as protracted conflicts, successfully resolved conflicts, and semi-resolved conflicts. The ultimate objective of this course is to provide students with the theoretical and practical skills necessary to respond to and resolve social and political conflicts. To do this, students should make use of the multiple case studies of international conflicts and simulations of different conflict scenarios that will be presented in class. A comparative approach to global conflict resolution processes will be the primary approach used to achieve this objective.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

5
The concept of the principle of responsibility in the light of public international law

The course deals with this topic according to a plan divided into two chapters, where it deals with the conditions for establishing the international responsibility of the state for violating human rights (Chapter One), which in turn is divided into two sections, dealing with the illegal act as a modern basis for international responsibility (the first topic), and attributing the violation of human rights The human being to the state (the second topic), while in (the second chapter) it deals with the actions of the state’s international responsibility for violating human rights, which in turn is divided into two sections, the multiplicity of ways of international responsibility in the face of the difficulties of moving responsibility in the field of human rights (the first topic), The results of the actions of the international responsibility of the state for the violation of human rights (Second Section). International responsibility is a recent topic in legal studies imposed by the rapid developments in the international community, and it continues to raise a wide debate in international jurisprudence and action. The International Law Commission of the United Nations, which has been working since 1961, has not yet reached the text of an international resolution on international responsibility. The importance of international responsibility lies in public international law, as it is an essential part of every legal system. This is noting that what hinders the development of international responsibility is the factor of power and strength in international relations. The subject of this course is limited to the assets on which international responsibility is based without exposure to special responsibilities such as responsibilities for nuclear activities, armaments reduction, terrorism or responsibility for the risks in launching space ships. It mainly focuses on illegal international action as a modern basis, and it also includes addressing the issue of diplomatic protection as an applied aspect of the international responsibility case, and finally, it examines the effects of international responsibility.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

6
International disputes and the principle of international responsibility

The course has four main objectives: A- Understanding conflict as a social phenomenon by discussing the concepts, models, mechanisms and theoretical frameworks that control its emergence, development and settlement through different stages, whether on the societal or international level. b- The ability to use this understanding by analyzing international conflicts, giving a reading of the reality of the conflict, its parties, its issues and the path it takes, and identifying opportunities for intervention to influence its course. C- Studying the understanding and applications of conflict analysis within the Arab and Islamic cultural framework. D- Determining the levels of intervention in international conflicts and defining the opportunities and risks resulting from the intervention. The course begins by presenting different definitions of conflict as a social phenomenon and the forms it takes through its stages of development and an attempt to touch the differences between the various concepts of the phenomenon such as “difference”, “conflict”, “conflict” and “fighting”. And then looking at what the scientific field aims to achieve in dealing with the phenomenon and differentiating between different levels such as “conflict settlement,” “conflict management,” “containment of conflict,” “conflict mitigation,” and “conflict transformation or reform,” to arrive at an accurate understanding of the international conflict. and civil wars. The course focuses largely on the causes and conditions that lead to its birth, as it uses many social theories that provide an explanation and interpretation of how international conflicts and civil wars erupt and develop through different stages, such as the theories of “basic human needs”, “relative deprivation”, “social identity” and “ Frustration-Aggression" and "Imbalances".. The course does not aim to indoctrinate students with these and other theories, but rather to identify and criticize them and to reach an understanding that is consistent with the cultural frameworks in which the conflict arises.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

Optional courses 24 Credits

1
Philosophy of political science

The course deals with the meaning and function of political philosophy, and then reviews the philosophies of Plato that he presented in his dialogues, as well as Aristotle as the founder of political science, and also the political philosophy of Muslims represented in Al-Farabi and Ibn Khaldun. Then he moves to the modern political philosophy of Hobbes, who worked to reorganize political thought in a rational-material framework, and Hegel's creations about the state and civil society, leading to the emergence of ideal socialism (utopia) and ending with Marx's materialistic socialism, which he founded on the basis of Hegelian.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

2
Common international law

In its first chapter, the course deals with the principles of public international law by introducing this law and its sources. As for the second chapter, it deals with the rights and duties of states, land, sea and air territory, international disputes, and diplomacy. While the third chapter deals with human rights by presenting its general principles, and the protection provided to certain types of persons such as children, women and others. The fourth chapter talks about international organization, by providing an overview of the international organization, and detailing the subject of international and regional organizations. In the fifth chapter, he presents the concept of international humanitarian law and its sources, as well as the law of war, military occupation, the protection of persons in armed conflicts, and the treatment of prisoners of war and detainees. Then, the course concludes with the international law of the sea, by introducing it, clarifying the types of countries according to their maritime locations, international corridors, bays and lakes, as well as the traffic regulations at sea, the International Seabed Authority, and finally the topic of settling international maritime disputes.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

3
Human Rights “Broader Understanding”

The course aims to introduce students to the most important concepts of human rights. It also aims to introduce them to the history of this field of knowledge and the most important discussions and theories emanating from it at the local, regional and global levels. The course addresses several topics such as international human rights covenants, research methods in the field of human rights, and highlights the four basic debates in the field of human rights related to universality versus privacy, the relationship between national sovereignty and human rights, economic and social rights versus civil and political rights, and individual rights versus rights collective. The course also focuses on international and regional mechanisms for the protection of human rights, and discussions related to the main obstacles to the protection of human rights and the factors that contribute to their development.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

4
Communication skills

The course aims to build and improve effective communication skills with others, as indicated by its title, to build your communication skill on sound foundations, and to improve this skill in a way that contributes to achieving success in your personal life and achieving excellence in your work. This course deals with many topics related to the development of the student's personal skills in effective communication to understand and influence others and to enhance his leadership abilities in accordance with the university's objectives towards preparing a scientifically and professionally qualified cadre in preparation for the future and facing its challenges and able to meet the needs of society. In this course, you will learn: the elements that characterize effective communication, the variation in communication media depending on the direction of communication, dealing with authority, addressing parties, etc., the different advantages and limitations of communication, skills for communicating with supervisors and colleagues in a variety of contexts and media, including Email etiquette, how to craft different messages for different audiences. The course comprises four modules filled with Introduction to Communication, Structuring Effective Communication, Professional Communication, and Personal Communication, respectively.

The curriculum’s inputs include: the form and type of knowledge, learners’ characteristics, needs, tendencies and interests, the society’s philosophy, values, hopes and aspirations. The outputs of the curriculum are: knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

5
The foreign policy of the big countries

The course seeks to study and analyze the foreign policies of major countries in terms of analyzing the internal and external factors affecting this policy, and the main objectives of foreign policies, analyzing foreign policy tools starting from diplomacy to the military tool, studying and analyzing the foreign policy of the United States, Russia, China, Britain France, Germany, and Japan.

The second stage - Practical Training 30 Credits

1
Practical Training

In practical training, the student is assigned to teach a virtual course chosen by the college from among the courses studied by the student at the bachelor's level. The student should divide this course from twelve to fourteen brief lectures. The student presents each lecture in the form of a written summary of its topic in Word or PDF format, accompanied by a video recording of it with the student's voice using Power Point, the duration of which is no less than ten minutes and not more than about twenty minutes.

The thrid stage - Master's Thesis 54 Credits

1
Master’s Thesis

The student submits a request to the university administration to register a master’s thesis, along with a proposed topic in one of the subspecialty tracks.

● If the initial approval of the subject title is achieved, the college council will designate a supervisor to guide and follow up the student in preparing the plan.

● The research plan includes the importance of the topic and a critical presentation of previous studies in it, specifically the research problem, then defining the study's curriculum and its main hypotheses or questions that you want to answer, and the division of the study and its sources.

● The student presents his proposed plan in a scientific seminar, discussing the plan as a topic and an approach.

● The student adjusts his plan based on the professors' observations in the seminar if he is asked to amend.

● After the seminar, the plan is presented to the college council to take its decision regarding the registration of the subject.

● In the event of approval, the college council’s decision is presented to the university council to approve registration, and the registration date is calculated from the university council’s approval date

To study a master’s degree at International Suleiman College, applicants must have an undergraduate degree from an accredited university. At International Suleiman College, we believe that a bachelor's degree is no longer enough to compete in the labor market, so we offer high-quality postgraduate programs for anyone who has a bachelor's degree and wishes to achieve their academic and research ambitions.
International Suleiman College provides a study commensurate with the student's capabilities, especially in line with the time allotted daily for study, given that the master's student has practical and social responsibilities. We expect fully taught students to be able to obtain a master's degree within two academic years. We expect students studying partially to be able to obtain a master's degree within 3-4 years of study.
The academic year is divided into four semesters. In each semester, the student is allowed to register a maximum of two research courses and one minimum course with a maximum of 24 credit hours and a minimum of 12 credit hours. Classes are distributed as follows: • The first semester begins at the beginning of the third week of October and ends at the end of the third week of December. • The second semester begins at the beginning of the first week of January and ends at the end of the first week of March. • The third semester begins at the beginning of the second week of March and ends at the end of the second week of May. • The fourth semester begins at the beginning of the fourth week of May and ends at the end of the fourth week of July. • Summer vacation begins at the beginning of August and continues for the third week of October. • After the end of each semester, a two-week vacation is scheduled between semesters.
The tuition fee is £75 per credit hour, • Students are allowed to register a maximum of 24 credit hours each semester and 12 credit hours as a minimum. • The student pays a one-time enrollment fee of 200 pounds when registering with the ISC • The student pays 100 sterling pounds per semester as the registration fee for study subjects. • The iddat hour = four actual hours.
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